Tag Archives: Mirror

THE SPIEGEL

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In January 1969 the Spiegel Publishing Company and Spiegel Editorial Staff entered in a new Hamburg Company Headquarters (the 3rd in its history). Located in the old town of Hamburg Spiegel Publishing House  was one of Verner Panton’s most unique interior creations and one of the few that continue to exist today. Panton is considered one of Denmark’s most influential 20th-century furniture and interior designers. All the designs of this interior were his own; the colour scheme, lamps, textiles, wall claddings – only the furniture had to be imported from Knoll International. At that time Spiegel manager Hans Detlev Becker gave the order to fill the cold cover inside with warmth.

Unfortunately, the swimming pool for the employees in the basement (above) was completely destroyed in a fire and redesigned in the 1990’s. Swimming here would have been a psychedelic experience.

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Exterior. The “decorative extravaganzas” as an amalgamation of geometry, color, murals, glass and glimmering light.

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Above the hallway. The specially designed mirror lighting used on walls and ceilings was of major importance.

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Above the work area.

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Above the conference room – chairs by Eero Saarinen.

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Above the waiting room.

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Above and below the Spiegel canteen – wire chairs by Harry Bertoia.

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The space resembled more like an avant-garde restaurant than a company canteen.

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Before their renovation in summer, 1998 canteen and snack bar were put under conservation of monuments and historic buildings.

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Above and below the snack bar.

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Verner Panton (13 Feb 1926 – 5 Sept 1998) was a modest man who was crazy about design and has influenced many of today’s designers. Panton himself once said: “The main purpose of my work is to provoke people into using their imagination and make their surroundings more exciting.” He  spent little time in Denmark and many most of his celebrated works were realised abroad. He broke from the craft-based traditions of Scandinavian furniture-making and experimented with new materials and concept.

http://www.verner-panton.com/spaces/archive/phase/309/

31 RUE CAMBON

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Behind the façade of the art – deco – influenced exterior, lies a perfectly preserved and ultra – luxurious piece of Chanel history. The apartment, situated above the flagship boutique on Rue Cambon, remains exactly as Chanel left it. Today, just a restricted number of  VIP with a badge are permitted into the building.

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In contrast to Coco’s personal space, the staircase had a heavy art- deco influence. It is still covered with cream carpet, while the walls are lined with panels of mirrors. During the fashion shows, which took place downstairs, Gabrielle Chanel would sit on the staircase. Thanks to the mirrors she could see everything taking place, but no one could see her. She wanted to know the immediate reaction, if the journalists and clients were pleased with the collection.

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She had this chandelier custom made. Can you see the iconic 5’s?

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The clear table in the picture below was the first piece of merchandising furniture for Chanel. Coco asked the designer to do something very clean and very simple to have all the costume jewelry, make-up, skincare, and perfume merchandised. It was to enhance the beauty of the product. At the time, it was very clever as she was one of the first to do this.

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“An Interior is the natural projection of the soul and Balzac was right to give as much importance to it, as to the way people dress…”, she once confided to biographer Paul Morland.

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The entrance to Coco’s apartment where an original work-chair is still where she left it. Lower chairs were used for fittings as it was easier to sew and work with the fabric closer  to the ground.

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The octagonal shape of the mirror on the wall was the inspiration for the cap of CHANEL No.5. It is also the same shape of the iconic Place Vendome, which Coco could see out of her window of her residence at the Ritz Hotel.

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The gold boxes on the coffee table were a gift from the Duke of Westminster.

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A small herd of carved wood deer silently occupy the space...

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The scale of the chandeliers, the coromandel screens, the mirrors: all reflected her intrepid personality. Coco had an eclectic mix of decor. French classic furniture, antiquities, Italian influences and Japanese deers. At the time, it was really exceptional to mix Orient and Occident- when East meets West.

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Above and below: a Greek statue over the fireplace’s mantle.

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The desk where Coco sketched her creations on paper.

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All of Coco’s books have deep red tones. Just like the iconic lipstick and the inside lining of the bags she created.

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Coco was very superstitious. Elements of this can be seen all over her apartment with sculptures of different animals and religious artifacts. She wanted to feel protected at all times. Chanel was a Leo and she incorporated its symbol, the Lion, into her personal space.

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The pig keeper of silver and gems may have been found by Chanel at a flea market.

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Chanel considered wheat to be her lucky charm…..here it glints in gold on the book bindings of the Old Testament.

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This tiny birdcage was a present from a retiring employee and was the inspiration  for the 1992 Coco perfume campaign, starring Vanessa Paradis, that was set in the Chanel apartment on Rue Cambon.

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The ornate Chinese screens and wall panels feature coromandel birds and camelia flowers, which came to be a signature for the Chanel fashion house that continues to be used to this day. It symbolized purity and longevity in Asia and was very prevalent in her designs.

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The Salon where Chanel entertained her guests including Elizabeth Taylor, Pablo Picasso, Igor Stravinsky and Salvador Dali. She is said to have hated doors and obscured them with Chinese screens.

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Chanel herself designed this long, sensuous sofa in the salon at 31 Rue Cambon. It was important to her that it was comfortable, and she took the unusual decision to have it made in suede, rather than silk or velvet. It was very cutting edge. An entire wall of leather bound books. Beige, brown and fawn colors are accented with black and crystal.

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The open mouth of a frog brings love, luck, money and health. If you look closely you can see a crystal placed in its mouth. Once, while Givenchy sat in the drawing room, a piece of crystal fell from the chandelier. He placed it in the mouth of the frog and it was never removed.

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Coco was photographed many times in this iconic white chair.

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A French trumeau over the fireplace, flanked on either side by Spanish vestry mirrors, crystal laden table lamps, and large rock crystal chandelier bejewel the main salon

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Mirrors were designed to be octagonal in shape. The top of the two tables below are black lacquer but were originally marble. Gabrielle Chanel wanted to take off the marble and have the black lacquer. It may remind you of CHANEL’s make-up-black lacquer with the logo on top.

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This hand sculpture was made for Chanel by the Italian artist Alberto Giacometti.

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Coco’s trademark black-and-white allover aesthetic.

http://pilarrossiblog.wordpress.com/2012/01/15/a-fascinating-glimpse-inside-coco-chanels-paris-home/

HOME STORE

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If anyone knows how to make domesticity interesting, it’s Alastair Hendy, the British chef and photographer. His new Home Store in Hastings, East Sussex, mixes a dash of history with a bit of theater—offering a mix of old and new utilitarian objects.

A design impresario, Hendy’s resume includes: Theater and costume designer at Central St. Martins; display manager at Habitat; chef for Antonio Carluccio; cookbook author; and well-known food and lifestyle photographer. His interests converge at Hendy’s Home Store, where he sells vintage tableware, brooms of every kind, candles, sinks, garden tools, and even some sensible furniture. On the weekends when he’s is down from London, the shop is also a restaurant, where Hendy serves up simple plates of fresh-off-the-boat seafood. “I am not an ornament person,” he says. “I like practical things, such as scissors, brushes, and string. My mum was a collector, and my grandfather—well, his life was held up by string; bailer’s twine held his coat together. It’s in my blood.”

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The store is housed in a three-story Georgian townhouse, which started life in 1823 as a soda-bottling shop. The restoration of the building took three years.

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Hendy has been collecting the wares over the past decade.

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A full set of Woods Beryl Ware: “A pale green tea china that would befriend a rock cake or a shortbread slice,” says Hendy.

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Hendy’s Home Store is modeled on a traditional department store; selling a little bit of everything.

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A vintage desk lamp along with rustic linens.

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The proprietor’s experience in shop displays is evident.

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A range of household objects on display in wooden bins.

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The brooms and brushes range from ostrich feather dusters and goat’s-hair parquet-floor brooms to copper-wire barbecue scrubbers and horsehair cobweb brooms.

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Seafood fresh-off-the-boat is available on the weekends.

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The Home Store Kitchen is a new building behind Hendy’s Home Store. Hendy won over the planners of Old Town Hastings by designing a building that is sympathetic to its surroundings.

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The white wall tiles are handmade and recreated from original Victorian tiles. The floor is made from reclaimed brick, which has been sealed for hygienic reasons.

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The galvanized wall lights were sourced from an antiques market: Hendy frequents the international antique and collectors fairs at Newark and Ardingly.

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On the weekends, when Hendy is down from London, he will cook at the end of the zinc-covered island and serve his guests around the table; seating around six. Another six guests can be accommodated in a small dining room. The fresh-off-the-boat seafood comes from the local fishermen huts at the beach.

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http://remodelista.com/posts/hendys-home-store-kitchen-in-hastings